Faculty Notes

Prof. Julian Ku Quoted in New York Times and Washington Post on Impending Amanda Knox Ruling

Julian Ku, Maurice A. Deane Distinguished Professor of Constitutional Law, Faculty Director of International Programs

Italy’s Highest Court Set to Rule in Amanda Knox Case
By Elisabetta Povoledo
The New York Times
March 24, 2015

Excerpt:

For some, the case came to serve as a cautionary tale of young Americans running wild while studying in a foreign country.

For others — mostly her supporters in the United States — Ms. Knox came to be seen as the innocent victim of a perplexing foreign legal system.

That opinion will be reinforced among supporters of Ms. Knox should the Court of Cassation confirm her guilt.

“People are mistrustful of results they don’t like, especially in a foreign country, and many Americans don’t like the results,” said Julian Ku, a professor of international law at Hofstra University.

But, he added, “a lot of folks in England would feel the same way about an acquittal.” Both sides “are ready to denounce the verdict, whichever way it goes,” he said.

If the court upholds a conviction, attention will shift from Italy’s judicial procedures to its diplomatic sphere. An extradition request — were Italy to make one — would probably be granted, Professor Ku said.

“In these cases, the United States normally extradites because they are constantly asking other countries to extradite,” he said. “It would weaken the United States’ case when it asks other countries to return people.”

At the same time, extradition “would be politically unpopular because she’s so popular and gets so much attention,” Professor Ku added. “It will be hard.”


A version of this article appears in print on March 25, 2015, on page A10 of the New York edition with the headline: Italy’s Highest Court Set to Rule in American’s Case.

Read the full New York Times article.


Italy’s highest court reviewing Amanda Knox’s fate
By Lindsey Bever
The Washington Post
March 25, 2015

Excerpt:

“In these cases, the United States normally extradites because they are constantly asking other countries to extradite,” Julian Ku, an international law professor at Hofstra University, told the New York Times. “It would weaken the United States’ case when it asks other countries to return people.”

But, he added, it “would be politically unpopular because she’s so popular and gets so much attention. It will be hard.”

Read the full Washington Post article.

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